District Overview
Understand key findings about the current state of K-12 public education across the city of Chicago.
 

CEO's corner

Dear CPS Families,

Chicago Public Schools is pleased to present the 2019-20 Annual Regional Analysis (ARA). This marks the third year we have released this report to provide families with a clear set of information about schools in your community.

Aligned with CPS’s Five-Year Vision, released in March 2019, the ARA is a comprehensive set of data that provides transparency into school quality, quantity, choice, and program variety across the district. The ARA ensures CPS leadership, educators, students, and families are working from the same set of information and helps us make informed, equitable decisions that meet the unique needs of every child.

We released the ARA for the second time in 2019 and engaged parents, educators, and community members from across the city. District leaders worked with CPS families to review the data for their respective communities and gather their feedback. Based on the extensive feedback we received last year from parents, educators, and community members, we have further refined this year’s ARA to include information on the district’s Community Schools partnerships, and the report will now be available on www.cps.edu/ara in a more interactive, accessible, and searchable format that can be translated into multiple languages.

Families and school leaders are also using ARA data to advocate for academic programs they would like to see added to their schools. In this year’s second annual Academic Program RFP process, 54 schools were invited to submit full proposals for a change in academic focus at their school. Decisions will be made soon about which schools will receive programmatic investments in the fall of 2020.

CPS is also excited to welcome our new Chief Portfolio Officer, Bing Howell, whose team is committed to engaging in a community-based, data-driven, and fully transparent school improvement process. The ARA will continue to be a vital tool to support these efforts.

The release of the ARA is one of the many ways we will continue to pursue educational equity throughout the district. Please review the 2019-20 ARA and consider using this data as a springboard for conversations with your school community about how CPS can better serve you.

Sincerely,

Janice K. Jackson, EdD
Chief Executive Officer
Chicago Public Schools

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Program Spotlight

Career & Technical Education

Chicago Public Schools (CPS) is committed to providing a high-quality public education for every child, in every neighborhood, that prepares each for success in college, career, and civic life. Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs at CPS provide rigorous technical training in high-wage, high-skill, in-demand industries that prepare high school students for post-secondary success.

During the 2019-20 school year, over 15,000 students enrolled in CTE courses, spanning 35 unique career pathways at 78 high schools. In an effort to provide additional access to high-quality CTE programming that will ensure CPS students’ success in college, career and civic life, CPS created an additional 1,000 seats in three citywide CTE programs open to students from every high school: the Chicago Builds construction training program, the Chicago Police and Firefighting Training Academy, and Cooperative Education work-study.

CTE’s goal is to support increased student access to existing programs, which include internships and apprenticeships across the city to explore, experience, and obtain the career of their dreams.

This year, CPS launched nine new CTE programs; seven were at schools that did not previously have CTE programming.

Mayor Lightfoot and Dr. Jackson are setting new goals to increase the quality of career and technical education programs. By 2023, CTE’s goal is that all students will receive some form of career exposure before graduation and half of all eligible students will be matched with an internship or apprenticeship through one of our employer partnerships.

In the next five years, Career Launch Chicago—a collaboration between CPS, City Colleges of Chicago, and corporate partners—will provide 1,000 students with apprenticeships in the fields of information technology, manufacturing, and healthcare.

CTE programs are funded through the federal Carl D. Perkins and state Career and Technical Education Improvement (CTEI) grants. Schools interested in opening a CTE program can apply for consideration through the Office of Early Childhood Education (OECE). Applications are considered and prioritized based on a variety of metrics, including labor market need, post-secondary alignment, student interest, fit with school vision, and equity.

CTE Program Locations 2019-2020

CTE Programs
 
Agriculture & Horticulture
 
Business & Finance
 
Construction & Architecture
 
Culinary Arts & Hospitality Management
 
Education & Training
 
Health Science
 
Information Technology
 
Law, Public Safety & Security
 
Manufacturing
 
Media & Communication Arts
 
Personal Care Services
 
Transportation
 
Multiple Programs

School Type

Attendance
Citywide

CTE Seats vs. Enrollment by Industry 2019-2020

Seats     Students
1

Enrollment does not include Ag Academy course enrollments to avoid double-counting.

2

Over-enrollment is due to in-process program phase-in/out.

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Introduction

The Annual Regional Analysis is a set of facts to inform community dialogue and district planning to address a central guiding question - What do families and communities need in terms of school options?

The purpose of the ARA is to support CPS’s goal of providing every student with a high-quality education in every neighborhood by giving stakeholders a consistent array of information regarding school quality, enrollment patterns, school choice, and program offering by region. The goal is to ensure that every student in Chicago has access to quality public schools and a variety of schools and programs.

The report includes information on all CPS schools, including traditional neighborhood, selective enrollment, magnet, charter, special education specialty, and Options (alternative) schools. This document is a common fact base from which to understand the school landscape in communities. The intent of the ARA is not to provide recommendations but rather a set of findings based on the data that serves as input to inform community dialogue and district planning.

The ARA is organized in 16 geographic regions, aligned with Chicago Neighborhoods Now planning zones. The regions were created by the City of Chicago’s Department of Planning and Development based on research on housing and jobs. They are defined with natural boundaries, such as rivers and railroads, in mind. These elements and transportation options are likely considerations for families in choosing schools. With the goal of utilizing a consistent structure year to year, these regions are more stable than city wards and school networks.

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  • Map of Regions



Overview

Explore this section to learn important background information about the region.

  • Map of CPS Schools

ATTENDANCE AREA AND CITYWIDE SCHOOLS

Some schools have attendance boundaries and others are citywide. Zoned schools have attendance boundaries. Every street address is assigned to one attendance area (or neighborhood) elementary school and one neighborhood high school. Citywide schools do not have attendance boundaries and admit students through a lottery.

SQRP RATING LEVELS

The School Quality Rating Policy (SQRP) is CPS’s policy for measuring annual school performance. Level 1+ is the highest level and Level 3 is the lowest level. The SQRP is a five-tiered performance rating based on a broad range of indicators of success, including, but not limited to, student test score performance, student academic growth, closing of opportunity gaps, school culture and climate, attendance, graduation, and preparation for post-graduation success. The metrics for elementary, traditional high schools, and Options high schools are different but the rating levels (Level 1+, 1, 2+, 2, and 3) are consistent across school types.

Map Of CPS Schools

School Type

Elementary Schools
Attendance
Citywide
High Schools
Attendance
Citywide
SQRP Rating (Levels)
1+
1
2+
2
3
Inability to Rate
IR
  • Demographic Composition

The racial/ethnic and socioeconomic composition of CPS has changed slightly since the 2016-17 school year.

RACIAL/ETHNIC COMPOSITION

The district has seen a decline in African American enrollment. Over the past four years, the percentage of African American students has dropped from 38% to 36%. The percentage of White students has increased from 10% to 11% of the district population.


African American enrollment declined by more than 16,000 since 2016

Racial/Ethnic Composition

Race/Ethnicity
 
African American
 
Asian
 
Latinx*
 
White
 
Other

* As a district, CPS has begun using the more inclusive term Latinx to respectfully recognize the diverse heritage and gender identities of our students and families.

FREE AND REDUCED LUNCH RATES

The share of students who qualify for free and reduced lunch (FRL) has decreased from 80% in 2016-17 to 76% in 2019-20.1


The share of students who qualify decreased 4 percentage points

FREE AND REDUCED LUNCH RATES

 
Free and Reduced Lunch
 
Without Free and Reduced Lunch
Median 2019 Household Income
 
0 to 39,000
 
39,000 to 50,300
 
50,300 to 64,500
 
64,500 to 86,200
 
86,200 to 501,000
1

Before 2015, CPS relied on the Nutrition Services department to administer, communicate, and collect the FRL forms. When the federal lunch program was expanded to all students, CPS needed to administer a separate “Fee Waiver Form” that replaced the FRL form. This new form, now without connection to a direct benefit to parents and families, may be leading to the decline in the number of reported FRL students.

NOTE: The dots on this map are pie charts showing the mix of students residing in an area. It does not show information about individual students. The white spaces in the map are areas where no students live. As a district, CPS has begun using the more inclusive term Latinx to respectfully recognize the diverse heritage and gender identities of our students and families.

  • Enrollment Patterns

Historical Enrollment

District enrollment numbers include all students in grades pre-kindergarten through 12th grade on the 20th day of each school year. The projections and forecast estimates are determined by CPS Department of Planning and Data Management analysis based on historical enrollment trends at each school. Other cities have seen similar enrollment trends.


Since 2010-2011, CPS total enrollment has decreased 11.8%
Over the next 3 years, the forecast shows an additional drop of 3.6%

Factors Impacting Enrollment

Broader citywide population trends indicate continued declining enrollment.

1. DECLINING BIRTHRATE

There has been a declining number of births per year, leading to a population decline in the city. Note that the number of births affects CPS enrollment approximately five years later, when children enter kindergarten.1

2. DECLINING CHILDHOOD POPULATION

The population of children ages 3 to 18 in Chicago is decreasing overall. The pattern is consistent across children enrolled in public or private/parochial schools or who are not enrolled in school. “Not enrolled” includes 3- and 4-year-olds who are not in pre-school, 18-year-olds who have graduated from high school but are not enrolled in college, and children who are truant or have dropped out. This chart combines CPS enrollment data and U.S. Census Bureau data for the 2009 to 2018 school years.2

 
Private/Parochial
 
CPS (public)
 
Not Enrolled
1

Illinois Department of Public Health

2

1-year American Community Survey census data, https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/data/pums.html


Quality

Explore this section to learn more about how many Level 1+/1 schools and seats are in CPS.


How Many Level 1+/1 schools Are There?

  • All CPS Schools

Over the past four years, the number of Level 1+/1 schools has decreased from 405 to 343, a decrease of 62 schools. During the same period, the number of Level 2+ schools has increased from 138 to 155 and the number of Level 2 and Level 3 schools has increased from 97 to 135.

All CPS Schools

SQRP Rating (Levels)
1+
1
2+
2
3
Inability to Rate
IR

How Many Level 1+/1 Seats Are There?

  • Elementary Seats Over Time

  • High School Seats Over Time

  • Options High School Seats Over Time

The decline in number of seats overall from 2017-18 to 2018-19 was driven primarily by the change in how building capacity is determined (see note below). Over the past four years, there has been a decrease in the percentage of Level 1+/1 seats in elementary schools, from 65% to 58%.

Elementary Seats

SQRP Rating (Levels)
1+
1
2+
2
3
Inability to Rate
IR

NOTE: In 2018-19, an update to the CPS space utilization standards resulted in a reduction in the number of classrooms used in the calculation of ideal capacity of a school building. Special-education cluster program classrooms, Pre-K classrooms, and small classrooms are no longer included in the number of seats.

High School Seats Over Time

The decline in number of seats overall from 2017-18 to 2018-19 was driven primarily by the change in how building capacity is determined (see note below). Over the past four years, there has been a decrease in the percentage of Level 1+/1 seats in high schools, from 50% to 37%.

High School Seats

SQRP Rating (Levels)
1+
1
2+
2
3
Inability to Rate
IR

Options High School Seats Over Time

Over the past four years, there has been an increase in the percentage of Level 1+/1 seats in Options high schools, from 39% to 44%.

Options High School Seats

SQRP Rating (Levels)
1+
1
2+
2
3
Inability to Rate
IR

NOTE: In 2018-19, an update to the CPS space utilization standards resulted in a reduction in the number of classrooms used in the calculation of ideal capacity of a school building. Special-education cluster program classrooms, Pre-K classrooms, and small classrooms are no longer included in the number of seats.

  • Elementary Seats by Region

  • High School Seats by Region

  • Options High School Seats by Region

The Central Area region has the highest percentage of Level 1+/1 elementary seats (100%); the Greater Stony Island region has the lowest (23%).


In 11 Regions, the majority of elementary seats are Level 1+/1.

Elementary Seats

SQRP Rating (Levels)
1+
1
2+
2
3
Inability to Rate
IR
Number of Seats

High School Seats by Region

The Central Area region has the highest percentage of Level 1+/1 high school seats (88%); the South Side region has the lowest (10%).


In 5 Regions, the majority of high school seats are Level 1+/1.

HIGH SCHOOL Seats

SQRP Rating (Levels)
1+
1
2+
2
3
Inability to Rate
IR
Number of Seats

Options High School Seats by Region

The Bronzeville/South Lakefront region has the highest percentage of Level 1+/1 Options high school seats (100%); six regions have no Level 1+/1 Options high school seats.


In 6 Regions, the majority of Options high school seats are Level 1+/1.

Options High School Seats

SQRP Rating (Levels)
1+
1
2+
2
3
Inability to Rate
IR
Number of Seats

How Many Students Are Enrolled in Level 1+/1 Schools?

  • Elementary Enrollment Over Time

  • High School Enrollment Over Time

  • Options High School Enrollment Over Time

  • Enrollment by Race / Ethnicity

  • Enrollment by Household Income

Over the past four years, there has been a decrease in enrollment in Level 1+/1 schools for elementary school students, from 71% to 65%.

Elementary

SQRP Rating (Levels)
1+
1
2+
2
3
Inability to Rate
IR

Over the past four years, there has been a decrease in enrollment in Level 1+/1 schools

High School Enrollment Over Time

Over the past four years, there has been a decrease in enrollment in Level 1+/1 schools for high school students, from 65% to 53%.

High School

SQRP Rating (Levels)
1+
1
2+
2
3
Inability to Rate
IR

Options High School Enrollment Over Time

Over the past four years, there has been an increase in enrollment in Level 1+/1 schools for Options high school students, from 38% to 44%.

Options High School

SQRP Rating (Levels)
1+
1
2+
2
3
Inability to Rate
IR

Enrollment by Race / Ethnicity

There is a disparity in the quality of schools attended by students of different races/ethnicities. 41% of African American students attend Level 1+/1 schools, compared to 66% of Latinx students, 91% of White students, and 91% of Asian students.

Race/Ethnicity

SQRP Rating (Levels)
1+
1
2+
2
3
Inability to Rate
IR

Enrollment by Household Income

There is a disparity in the quality of schools attended by students of different household income levels based on the median for the census tract in which they reside. 87% of students living in the highest household income areas attend Level 1+/1 schools, compared to 31% of students from the lowest household income areas.

Household Income

SQRP Rating (Levels)
1+
1
2+
2
3
Inability to Rate
IR
  • Elementary Enrollment by Region

  • High School Enrollment by Region

  • Options High School Enrollment by Region

For elementary schools, the regions with the highest percentages of students who live in the region attending a Level 1+/1 school are Central Area (96%), Greater Lincoln Park (93%), and Northwest Side (91%). In the Greater Stony Island region, 32% of elementary school students who live in the region attend a Level 1+/1 school.

Elementary Enrollment

SQRP Rating (Levels)
1+
1
2+
2
3
Inability to Rate
IR

High School Enrollment by Region

For elementary schools, the regions with the highest percentages of students who live in the region attending a Level 1+/1 school are Central Area (96%), Greater Lincoln Park (93%), and Northwest Side (91%). In the Greater Stony Island region, 32% of elementary school students who live in the region attend a Level 1+/1 school.

High School Enrollment

SQRP Rating (Levels)
1+
1
2+
2
3
Inability to Rate
IR

Options High School Enrollment by Region

For Options high schools, the two regions with the highest percentage of students who live in the region attending a Level 1+/1 school are Bronzeville / South Lakefront (65%) and West Side (45%). In the Far Southwest Side and Greater Midway regions, 19% and 21% respectively, of Options students attend a L1+/1 school.

SQRP Rating (Levels)
1+
1
2+
2
3
Inability to Rate
IR

Do Students Have Access to Level 1+/1 Schools?

  • Elementary Seats, Enrollment and Access

  • High School Seats, Enrollment and Access

  • Options High School Seats, Enrollment and Access

In the 2019-20 school year, there were more than 105,000 unfilled elementary seats across the district, roughly 44,000 of which are Level 1+/1. 95% of unfilled Level 1+/1 elementary seats do not have admissions criteria.

Seats
Students

Elementary Seats vs. Students

Admission Type of Level 1+/1 Seats

 
No Admissions Criteria
 
Some Programs with Admissions Criteria
 
Schoolwide Admissions Criteria

High School Seats, Enrollment and Access

In the 2019-20 school year, there were more than 105,000 unfilled elementary seats across the district, roughly 44,000 of which are Level 1+/1. 95% of unfilled Level 1+/1 elementary seats do not have admissions criteria.

Seats
Students

High School Seats vs. Students

Admission Type of Level 1+/1 Seats

 
No Admissions Criteria
 
Some Programs with Admissions Criteria
 
Schoolwide Admissions Criteria

Options High School Seats, Enrollment and Access

In the 2019-20 school year, there were more than 105,000 unfilled elementary seats across the district, roughly 44,000 of which are Level 1+/1. 95% of unfilled Level 1+/1 elementary seats do not have admissions criteria.

Seats
Students

Options High School Seats vs. Students


Quantity

Explore this section for information on the number of seats and enrollment patterns in CPS.


How Many Students Are There?

  • CPS Student Population

The population of the district has decreased by 26,193 students since the 2016-17 school year, a decline of 6.9%. This change has been driven primarily by a decline of students in grades K-8 (a decrease of 18,692 students over four years or 7.4%), while the number of high school students has been more consistent (decreasing by 4,320 students over four years or 4.0%). Enrollment data are from the annual 20th-day count.

CPS Population

 
9 - 12
 
K - 8
 
PE & PK

How Many Seats Are There for the Student Population?

  • Number of Students Enrolled in Elementary and High School Buildings1

There are more than 147,000 unfilled seats this school year. That gap is expected to increase in the coming years: in 2023, the number of students is forecasted to be 314,000, and the gap is estimated to be greater than 165,000.

Current2

Seats
Students
 
Elementary
 
High School

2023 Forecast3

Seats
Students
 
Elementary
 
High School

NOTE: For these charts, the elementary grades students enrolled in combination K12 schools are grouped into the high school category.

1

Enrollment and seats figures listed here do not include Pre-K and Cluster students

2

Number of seats is the adjusted ideal capacity of the school building or the charter contract enrollment cap.

3

Projections and forecast estimated based on Department of Planning and Data Management analysis.


How Many Pre-Kindergarten Seats Are There for the Student Population?

  • Pre-K Seats

  • Pre-K Enrollment

  • Full Day Pre-K Enrollment vs. Seats

  • Pre-K Enrollment by Race/Ethnicity

This year, there are 21,458 Pre-K seats in school-based Pre-K programs. The Far Northwest Side and the West Side regions have the highest number of seats, with 2,374 and 2,304 seats respectively. The West Side Region has the highest number of full-day Pre-K seats.

Pre-K Seats

 
Full Day
 
Half Day

*Share of CPS kindergarten students provided to show how regions differ in size of population.

Pre-K Enrollment

This year, total Pre-K enrollment as of the 20th day of school (October 1st) was 17,492 students in school-based Pre-K programs. 66% of total enrollment is in full-day programs for 4 year olds. Pre-K enrollment continues to occur over the course of the school year.

Pre-K Enrollment

 
Full Day Age 4
 
Half Day Age 4
 
Full Day Age 3
 
Half Day Age 3

Full-Day Pre-K Enrollment vs. Seats

At the district level, 82% of Pre-K seats were filled as of October 2019 (20th day count). The majority of unfilled seats are in the Greater Stony Island, the West Side, the South Side and the Pilsen / Little Village regions.

Full-Day Pre-K Enrollment vs. Seats

 
Pre-K Seats
 
Unfilled Seats

Pre-K Enrollment by Race/Ethnicity

Enrollment in Pre-K by race and ethnicity mostly mirrors enrollment by race and ethnicity in Kindergarten. 44% of Pre-K students are Latinx, compared with 42% of Kindergarten students, and 36% of Pre-K students are African American, compared with 35% of Kindergarten students.

Pre-K Enrollment

Race/Ethnicity
 
African American
 
Asian
 
Latinx
 
White
 
Other

Choice

Explore this section for information on school choice patterns and student commute distance and time.


Are Students Choosing Schools in their Region?

  • Elementary Choice Over Time

  • Elementary School Quality and Choice

  • Elementary School Choice by Race/Ethnicity

  • Elementary School Choice by Region

  • Elementary Student's Distance Traveled to School

  • Elementary Student's Time Traveled to School

  • Elementary Student's Distance Traveled to School by Race/Ethnicity

  • Elementary Student's Time Traveled to School by Race/Ethnicity

School choice is currently defined as attending a school that is not a student’s zoned school. Over the past four years, elementary students attending a non-zoned school (in or out of region) has increased from 41% to 42%. In the same time frame, students attending their zoned school remained at 59%.

NOTE: Due to rounding, some charts may not add up to 100%.

Elementary Choice Over Time

 
Attending School Out of Region
 
Attending Non-Zoned in Region
 
Attending Zoned School

Elementary School Quality and Choice

Of the elementary students in the district, 65% are at Level 1+/1 schools. This percentage is relatively consistent across school choice decisions. 67% of students who attend their zoned school are at Level 1+/1 schools, compared to 59% of students who attend a non-zoned school in their region and 67% of students who attend a non-zoned school outside of their region.

Elementary School Quality and Choice

SQRP Rating (Levels)
1+
1
2+
2
3
Inability to Rate
IR

Elementary School Choice by Race/Ethnicity

School choice does vary by race/ethnicity. In this past year, 46% of African American elementary students attended their zoned school, compared to 66% of Latinx students, 70% of White students, and 66% of Asian students. African American students are also the largest percentage of students attending a school outside of their region (22%), except for “Other.” White and Latinx students have the lowest percentage of students attending a school outside of the region (14%).

Elementary School Choice by Race/Ethnicity

 
Attending School Out of Region
 
Attending Non-Zoned in Region
 
Attending Zoned School

Elementary School Choice by Region

The Pilsen / Little Village region has the highest percentage of students who attend school in region (zoned or non-zoned school) at 90% and the Near West Side region has the lowest percentage (69%).


17% of Elementary School students attend school outside of the region where they live

Elementary School Choice by Region

 
Attending School Out of Region
 
Attending Non-Zoned in Region
 
Attending Zoned School

Elementary Student's Distance Traveled to School

These graphs show the average distance traveled and commute time for elementary school students who live in each region, regardless of whether they attend school in or out of the region.

Elementary students travel an average of 1.4 miles to school. However, 70% of students travel 0-1 miles to school and 13% of students travel more than 3 miles to school.

There is significant variation by region. 86% of students residing in Pilsen / Little Village travel 0-1 miles compared to 55% of students in Bronzeville/South Lakefront.

Citywide Average is 1.4 Miles

Elementary Student's Distance Traveled to School

 
6+ miles
 
3 - 6 miles
 
1 - 3 miles
 
0 - 1 miles
Number of Students

Elementary Student's Time Traveled to School

Elementary students travel an average of 15 minutes to school. However, 71% of students travel 0 to 15 minutes to school and 5% of students travel more than 45 minutes to school.

There is significant variation by region. 87% of students residing in Pilsen / Little Village travel 0 to 15 minutes compared to 58% of students in Greater Stony Island.

Citywide Average is 15 Minutes

Elementary Student's Time Traveled to School

 
60+ minutes
 
45 - 60 minutes
 
30 - 45 minutes
 
15 - 30 minutes
 
0 - 15 minutes
 
Number of Students

Elementary Student's Distance Traveled to School by Race/Ethnicity

There is some variation in travel distances by race and ethnicity. At the Elementary School level, 77% of Latinx students travel less than 1 mile to school, compared to 60% of African American and 74% of White students.

 
6+ miles
 
3 - 6 miles
 
1 - 3 miles
 
0 - 1 miles
Number of Students

Elementary Student’s Time Traveled to School by Race/Ethnicity

There is also some variation in travel times by race and ethnicity. At the Elementary School level, 77% of Latinx students travel less than 15 minutes to school, compared to 62% of African American students. 8% of African American elementary students travel more than 45 minutes, compared to 3% of White students.

 
60+ minutes
 
45 - 60 minutes
 
30 - 45 minutes
 
15 - 30 minutes
 
0 - 15 minutes
 
Number of Students
  • Percentage of 8th Grade Students Who Applied to High School

  • Percentage of Students Who Received an Offer from one of their Top 3 Choices

  • High School Choice Over Time

  • High School Quality and Choice

  • High School by Race/Ethnicity

  • High School by Region

  • High School Student's Distance Traveled to School

  • High School Student's Time Traveled to School

  • High School Student's Distance Traveled to School by Race/Ethnicity

  • High School Student's Time Traveled to School by Race/Ethnicity

In the 2017-18 school year, CPS launched a new high school application process, GoCPS, which created a single application and timeline for all high schools. Only high school programs that require an application for admissions are included. Applicants were asked to rank the schools and programs on their application in order of preference. Students are guaranteed a seat in the general education program at their zoned/neighborhood high school and did not have to submit an application for that program. For more information about the GoCPS application process, visit go.cps.edu.

99% of all 8th grade CPS students applied to high school programs across Rounds 1 and 2 of the GoCPS application process. Greater Stockyards, Pilsen / Little Village and Greater Lincoln Park regions had the highest application rate (100%) while the Far Southwest Side had the lowest (81%).

% Of 8th Grade Students Who Applied To High School

 
Applied
 
Did Not Apply

Percentage Of Students Who Received An Offer From One Of Their Top 3 Choices

Of all 8th grade CPS students that applied to high school programs in Round 1, 84% received an offer from one of their top three choices. (This figure does not include selective enrollment high schools.)

% Of Students Who Received An Offer From One Of Their Top 3 Choices

 
1st Choice
 
2nd Choice
 
3rd Choice
 
4th or lower Choice

High School Choice Over Time

School choice is currently defined as attending a school that is not a student’s zoned school. Over the past four years, high school students attending a non-zoned school (in or out of region) has risen from 75% to 76%. In the same time frame, students attending their zoned school has declined from 25% to 24%.

High School Choice Over Time

 
Attending School Out of Region
 
Attending Non-Zoned in Region
 
Attending Zoned School

High School Quality and Choice

Of the high school students in the district, 52% are at Level 1+/1 schools. This percentage varies across school choice decisions. 33% of students who attend their zoned school are at Level 1+/1 schools, compared to 52% of students who attend a non-zoned school in their region and 63% of students who attend a non-zoned school outside of their region.

High School Quality and Choice

SQRP Rating (Levels)
1+
1
2+
2
3
Inability to Rate
IR

High School Choice by Race/Ethnicity

School choice does vary by race/ethnicity. This year, 15% of African American high school students attended their zoned school, compared to 29% of Latinx students, 30% of White students, and 26% of Asian students. African American students are also the largest percentage of students attending a school outside of their region (51%). Latinx students have the lowest percentage of students attending a school outside of the region (41%).

High School Choice by Race/Ethnicity


24% of High School students attend their zoned school
 
Attending School Out of Region
 
Attending Non-Zoned in Region
 
Attending Zoned School

High School Choice by Region

More high school students attend school out of region than elementary students. The Greater Stony Island and Greater Milwaukee Avenue regions have the highest rates of students attending school out of region (64% and 59%, respectively).


45% of High School students attend school outside of the region where they live

High School Choice by Region

 
Attending School Out of Region
 
Attending Non-Zoned in Region
 
Attending Zoned School
 
Number of Students

High School Student’s Distance Traveled to School

These graphs show the average distance traveled and commute time for high school students who live in each region, regardless of whether they attend school in or out of the region.

High school students travel an average of 3.3 miles to school. 22% of students travel 0-1 miles to school and 40% of students travel more than 3 miles to school.

There is significant variation by region. 33% of students residing in the Pilsen / Little Village region travel 0-1 miles compared to 10% of students in the Greater Stony Island region.

Citywide Average is 3.3 Miles

High School Student's Distance Traveled to School

 
6+ miles
 
3 - 6 miles
 
1 - 3 miles
 
0 - 1 miles
Number of Students

High School Student’s Time Traveled to School

High school students travel an average of 28 minutes to school. 27% of students travel 0 to 15 minutes to school and 17% of students travel more than 45 minutes to school.

There is significant variation by region. 42% of students residing in the Pilsen / Little Village region travel 0 to 15 minutes compared to 13% of students in the South Side region.

Citywide Average is 28 Minutes

High School Student's Time Traveled to School

 
60+ minutes
 
45 - 60 minutes
 
30 - 45 minutes
 
15 - 30 minutes
 
0 - 15 minutes
 
Number of Students

High School Student’s Distance Traveled to School by Race/Ethnicity

There is some variation in travel distances by race and ethnicity. At the High School level, 27% of Latinx students travel less than 1 mile to school, compared to 16% of African American students.

High School Student’s Distance Traveled to School by Race/Ethnicity

 
6+ miles
 
3 - 6 miles
 
1 - 3 miles
 
0 - 1 miles
Number of Students

High School Student’s Time Traveled to School by Race/Ethnicity

There is also some variation in travel times by race and ethnicity. At the High School level, 33% of Latinx students travel less than 15 minutes to school, compared to 21% of African American students and 21% of White students. 21% of African American high school students travel more than 45 minutes, compared to 14% of Latinx students.

High School Student’s Time Traveled to School by Race/Ethnicity

 
60+ minutes
 
45 - 60 minutes
 
30 - 45 minutes
 
15 - 30 minutes
 
0 - 15 minutes
 
Number of Students
  • Options High School Choice Over Time

  • Options High School Choice by Region

  • Options High School Students' Distance Traveled to School

  • Options High School Students' Time Traveled to School

Over the past four years, the share of Options high school students attending a school in their region has declined from 41% to 37%.

Options High School Choice Over Time

 
Attending School Out of Region
 
Attending Non-Zoned in Region

Options High School Choice by Region

More Options high school students attend school out of region than both high school and elementary students. The Far Southwest Side and Greater Lincoln Park regions have the highest rate of students attending school out of region (100% in each). This is due to the lack of Options high schools in those regions.

Options High School Choice by Region

 
Attending School Out of Region
 
Attending Non-Zoned in Region
 
Attending Zoned School

Options Students' Distance Traveled to School

This graph shows the average distance traveled for Options high school students who live in each region, regardless of whether they attend school in or out of the region. The average Options high school student in the district travels 3.9 miles to school. The regions with the shortest commute are Pilsen / Little Village (2.4 miles) and Greater Milwaukee Avenue (2.6 miles). The regions with the longest commute are the North Lakefront (6.3 miles) and Greater Calumet (5.5 miles) regions. 13% of students travel 0-1 miles to school and 52% of students travel more than 3 miles to school.

Citywide Average is 3.9 Miles

 
6+ miles
 
3 - 6 miles
 
1 - 3 miles
 
0 - 1 miles

Options Students' Distance Traveled to School

 
6+ miles
 
3 - 6 miles
 
1 - 3 miles
 
0 - 1 miles
Number of Students

Options Students' Time Traveled to School

This graph shows the average time traveled for Options high school students who live in each region, regardless of whether they attend school in or out of the region. The average Options high school student in the district travels 31 minutes to school. The regions with the shortest commute are Pilsen / Little Village (23 minutes) and Greater Milwaukee Avenue (24 minutes). The regions with the longest commute are the Northwest Side (40 minutes) and Far Northwest Side (38 minutes) regions. 18% of students travel 0 to 15 minutes to school and 20% of students travel more than 45 minutes to school.

Citywide Average is 31 Minutes

 
60+ minutes
 
45 - 60 minutes
 
30 - 45 minutes
 
15 - 30 minutes
 
0 - 15 minutes

Options Students' Time Traveled to School

 
60+ minutes
 
45 - 60 minutes
 
30 - 45 minutes
 
15 - 30 minutes
 
0 - 15 minutes
 
Number of Students

Where do Students Enrolled in Options Schools Reside and Where are Options Schools?

  • Option Students Residing and Enrolling


7% of High School students are in Options High Schools
Number of Options Students Residing by Region
 
29 - 100
 
101 - 500
 
501 - 1,000
 
1,001 - 1,289
School Type
Attendance Area
Citywide
SQRP Rating (Levels)
1+
1
2+
2
3
Inability to Rate
IR
  # of Options Students% of Options Students
South Side 98612%
West Side 1,22011%
Greater Stony Island 75811%
Bronzeville / South Lakefront 53211%
Greater Calumet 62310%
Near West Side 848%
Greater Stockyards 3756%
Greater Midway 8746%
Far Southwest Side 715%
Pilsen / Little Village 3005%
Greater Milwaukee Avenue 3065%
North Lakefront 1324%
Northwest Side 3804%
Far Northwest Side 5063%
Greater Lincoln Park 703%
Central Area 323%
District 7,2497%

Variety

Explore this section to learn more about the variety of schools and program types available throughout CPS.


Do Students Have Access to the Variety of Schools and Programs Offered?

  • Elementary Programs Maps

  • Elementary Program Density Table

Program Density

The Program Density Index measures the “density” of certain academic programs in each region. The index is calculated as the number of program seats per 100 age-eligible CPS students who reside in the region; this index can be used to compare program availability across regions. For more information about types of programs, visit https://cps.edu/Pages/AcademicProgramRFP.aspx.

Most regions have either World Language Magnet/Magnet Cluster or Dual Language programs. The Greater Milwaukee Ave, Northwest Side and Pilsen / Little Village regions have a strong density of language programs. The North Lakefront, Central Area and Far Southwest Side regions have neither types of language programs.

World Language
Dual Language

Selective Enrollment elementary programs (Regional Gifted Centers, Classical and Academic Centers) are present in 12 regions. Selective enrollment schools and programs admit students using a testing process.

Regional Gifted Centers/Classical
Academic Centers

All regions offer some elementary IB programming. The Near West Side and Far Southwest Side regions have the highest density of seats per students. Elementary IB programs have no admissions criteria.

Personalized Learning is a learner-driven instructional model that fosters 21st century skills by empowering every student to actively co-design their learning path, pace, and environment according to their individual needs, strengths, and interests. These data include schools that are on the path to schoolwide adoption of this approach. The Greater Milwaukee Avenue, South Side, and West Side regions have the highest density of elementary seats-per-students.

Elementary IB
Elementary PL

STEM elementary programs include STEM, STEAM, Math, Science, Engineering, and Technology Magnet and Magnet Cluster programs. The Near West Side has the highest density of seats (112 seats per 100 eligible students).

Nearly all regions have Magnet/Magnet Cluster Fine & Performing Arts programs. The Greater Lincoln Park, Central Area, North Lakefront and Near West Side regions have the highest densities of seats-per-students.

Elementary STEM
Elementary Arts

Elementary Program Density Table

# Seats per 100 Students

  Academic CenterDual LanguageFine & Performing ArtsInternational BaccalaureateOtherPersonalized LearningRGC/ClassicalSelective EnrollmentSTEMWorld Language
Region 1: Far Northwest Side 26642510103
Region 2: Northwest Side 4221113103053
Region 3: North Lakefront 00491201100370
Region 4: Greater Lincoln Park 0127062901402015
Region 5: Greater Milwaukee Avenue 045241235540024
Region 6: West Side 034532500372
Region 7: Near West Side 43046285309011218
Region 8: Central Area 0052120080170
Region 9: Pilsen / Little Village 021274115202212
Region 10: Greater Stockyards 081929500105
Region 11: Greater Midway 0171470100040
Region 12: South Side 6018283410166
Region 13: Bronzeville / South Lakefront 12003171602311
Region 14: Greater Stony Island 0022681910814
Region 15: Far Southwest Side 10020191106000
Region 16: Greater Calumet 40184015101210
1

Programs listed do not have admissions criteria for enrollment.

2

STEM elementary programs include STEM, STEAM, Math, Science, Engineering and Technology magnet and magnet cluster programs. Many schools may offer STEM programming outside of magnet schools/magnet cluster programs.

3

Personalized Learning is a learner-driven instructional model that fosters 21st century skills by empowering every student to actively co-design their learning path, pace, and environment according to their individual needs, strengths, and interests. This data includes schools that are on the path to schoolwide adoption of this approach.

4

Many schools offer arts programming outside of magnet schools/magnet cluster programs. Schools receive a Creative Schools Certification indicating the strength of their arts programming. More information can be found on each school’s profile page.

NOTE: Several elementary schools are currently incubating programs that are not included in the figures above. The following elementary schools will begin Dual Language programming next school year: Clark (West Side), Eberhart (Greater Midway), Funston (Greater Milwaukee Avenue), Goethe (Greater Milwaukee Avenue), and Salazar (Central Area). The following schools will begin Fine & Performing Arts programming next school year: Cameron (West Side), Belmont-Cragin (Far Northwest Side), Till (Bronzeville / South Lakefront), and Portage Park (Far Northwest Side). The following elementary schools are incubating or are candidates for authorization for the IB Primary Years program: Faraday (West Side), Fiske (Bronzeville / South Lakefront), Josephine Locke (Far Northwest Side), McPherson (Northwest Side), and Moos (Greater Milwaukee Ave). The following elementary schools are i incubating or are candidates for authorization for the IB Middle Years program: Belding (Northwest Side), Fairfield (Greater Midway), Little Village (Pilsen / Little Village), and Pickard (Pilsen / Little Village). The following elementary schools will begin Personalized Learning programming next school year: Addams (Greater Calumet) and Hawthorne (Greater Lincoln Park). The following elementary school will begin to phase in a Regional Gifted Center next school year: McPherson (Northwest Side). The following elementary schools will begin STEAM programming next school year: Chase (Greater Milwaukee Avenue), Earhart (Greater Stony Island), Evergreen (Greater Stockyards), and Peterson (Northwest Side). The following elementary schools will begin STEM programming next school year: Columbia Explorers (Greater Stockyards), Cuffe (South Side), Everett (Greater Stockyards), Peck (Greater Midway), and Shoop (Greater Calumet).and Pickard (Pilsen / Little Village).

  • High School Programs Maps

  • High School Program Density Table

Program Density

The Program Density Index measures the “density” of certain academic programs in each region. The index is calculated as the number of program seats per 100 age-eligible CPS students who reside in the region; this index can be used to compare program availability across regions. For high school programs, this index is calculated using the number of seats available for 9th grade via the GoCPS application process and the number of 9th graders who reside in the region. For more information about types of programs, visit https://cps.edu/Pages/AcademicProgramRFP.aspx.

Most regions offer high school IB programs, although there is a disparity in density. The highest concentration of IB seats are in the Greater Stockyards and Bronzevile / South Lakefront regions. The West Side, Near West Side, and Central Area regions have no high school IB programs. High school IB diploma programs have admissions criteria.

Personalized Learning is a learner-driven instructional model that fosters 21st century skills by empowering every student to actively co-design their learning path, pace, and environment according to their individual needs, strengths, and interests. These data include schools that are on the path to schoolwide adoption of this approach. The North Lakefront, Greater Stony Island, and South Side regions have the highest density of high school seats-per-students.

High School IB
High School PL

Early College STEM high schools offer technology curricula, college credit and corporate partnerships. They are in eight regions across the city. Note: Many schools may offer STEM programming outside of magnet schools/magnet cluster programs and early college STEM schools.

Fine & Performing Arts high school programs are available in eight regions across the city.

High School STEM
High School Arts

Career & Technical Education (CTE) high school programs are relatively dispersed through the city. All regions offer some type of CTE programming except for the Greater Lincoln Park, Near West Side and Far Southwest Side regions. Some CTE programs have admissions criteria, but others are open enrollment.

Military high schools have specific admissions criteria and are in six regions, but those regions are relatively spread out across the district. There are 39 traditional JROTC (Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps) programs in high schools across nearly all regions.

Career & Technical Education (CTE)
Military & JROTC

There is disparity in Selective Enrollment high schools and program availability and density throughout the city – the Central Area, Near West Side and Northwest Side regions have a high concentration of selective enrollment seats. Selective enrollment programs have admissions criteria.

Selective Enrollment

High School Program Density Table

# Seats per 100 Students

  Dual LanguageFine & Performing ArtsInternational BaccalaureateMilitaryOtherPersonalized LearningSelective EnrollmentSTEMWorld LanguageCareer & Technical EducationCTE: Building/TransportationCTE: Business/LawCTE: CulinaryCTE: HealthCTE: ITCTE: Media/ CommunicationCTE: Other
Region 1: Far Northwest Side 0047715000238322260
Region 2: Northwest Side 071539748002032311001
Region 3: North Lakefront 02477350500540150007404
Region 4: Greater Lincoln Park 0289940000000000000
Region 5: Greater Milwaukee Avenue 09591700000120242220
Region 6: West Side 00040881102321132230
Region 7: Near West Side 000900014220104010100100010
Region 8: Central Area 0000002200079262690909
Region 9: Pilsen / Little Village 08151450080224244602
Region 10: Greater Stockyards 00511150000112020052
Region 11: Greater Midway 0313308480164211422
Region 12: South Side 0013301971403811470718
Region 13: Bronzeville / South Lakefront 08711601831003790240184
Region 14: Greater Stony Island 0077019670218233023
Region 15: Far Southwest Side 0092869000077000017060
Region 16: Greater Calumet 00112201610190180222750
1

Selective Enrollment, Military, and IB programs have admissions criteria for enrollment.

2

Many schools may offer STEM programming outside of early college STEM schools.

3

Personalized Learning is a learner-driven instructional model that fosters 21st century skills by empowering every student to actively co-design their learning path, pace, and environment according to their individual needs, strengths, and interests. This data includes schools that are on the path to schoolwide adoption of this approach.

4

Many schools offer arts programming outside of these specific Fine & Performing Arts programs. Schools receive a Creative Schools Certification indicating the strength of their arts programming. More information can be found on each school’s profile page.

5

CTE: Building/Transportation includes Manufacturing and Engineering pathways.

6

CTE: Other includes Agriculture & Horticulture, Personal Care Services, and Family & Consumer Services.

7

Pre-Engineering, Pre-Law, and Health Sciences programs have admissions criteria.

NOTE: Several high schools are currently incubating programs that are not included in the figures above. The following high school will begin Dual Language programming next school year: Roosevelt HS (Northwest Side). The following high school will begin Early College STEM programming next school year: Chicago Military Academy at Bronzeville (Bronzeville/South Lakefront). The following high schools will begin Fine & Performing Arts programming next school year: Collins HS (West Side) and Wells HS (Greater Milwaukee Avenue). The following high school is in the pre-candidacy phase for the IB Middle Years program: Clark HS (West Side). The following high school will begin STEAM programming next school year: Steinmetz HS (Far Northwest Side).


How Does Student Demand Compare to Current Program Seats?

  • Number of Applications vs. Number of Available Seats by Program Type

In the 2017-18 school year, CPS launched a new high school application process, GoCPS, which created a single application and timeline for all high schools. Only high school programs that require an application for admissions are included. Applicants were asked to rank order the schools and programs on their application in order of preference. Students are guaranteed a seat in the general education program at their zoned/neighborhood high school and did not have to submit an application for that program. For more information about the GoCPS application process, visit http://go.cps.edu.

These graphs show high school program choices that were ranked #1 by applicants using the GoCPS application. These graphs compare the number of applications to different programs and the total number of program seats. Programs of all types in Level 1+/1 schools had a high number of applications. For example, there were 2,534 applications to International Baccalaureate programs at Level 1+/1 schools, with 1,855 program seats. However, there were also a high number of applications of all kinds to Level 2+ schools. For example, there were 2,008 applications to Level 2+ Career & Technical Education (CTE), with 3,403 program seats.

Total Program Seats
Total Applications

General Education

Total Program Seats
Total Applications

Career & Technical Education (CTE)

Total Program Seats
Total Applications

International Baccalaureate (IB)

Total Program Seats
Total Applications

STEM

Total Program Seats
Total Applications

Fine & Performing Arts

Total Program Seats
Total Applications

Military and JROTC

NOTE: These charts shows schools’ SQRP Level for the 2018-2019 school year, the year in which these 8th grade students applied to high school.


Do Students Have Access to the Variety of Schools and Programs Offered?

  • Community Schools Initiative (CSI)

CSI Goals are to
  • Transform and maintain selected public schools to become the centers of their communities, with campuses open mornings, afternoons, evenings, weekends and into the summer
  • Connect children and families to a range of services that foster individual and economic well-being
  • Counteract the effects of a range of negative factors that contribute to students’ lack of opportunities and underachievement
  • Engage parents and the community to improve academic achievement

CSI serves 28,993 students and 5,516 parents across three different models:

  1. 21st Century Community Learning Centers
  2. (CSI 21st CCLC): District-Managed
  3. CSI External Partnerships (CSIx): Partner Agency-Managed, awarded grants with CPS as co-applicant
  4. Sustainable Community Schools (SCS):
  5. Partnership with Chicago Teachers Union
Programs

School Type

Elementary Schools
Attendance
Citywide
High Schools
Attendance
Citywide
 
21st Century Community Learning Centers
 
21st Century Community Learning Centers, Sustainable Community Schools
 
CSI External Partnerships
 
CSI External Partnerships, Sustainable Community Schools
 
Sustainable Community Schools